CC: The Continuing Adventures of Randolph Carter

Social Icons

twitter facebook google plus linkedin rss feed email

Pages

Friday, April 25, 2014

CC: The Continuing Adventures of Randolph Carter

Randolph Carter is a recurring protagonist in H. P. Lovecraft's fiction and—presumably—a disguised alter ego of Lovecraft himself.  He first appears in "The Statement of Randolph Carter" (1919), a short story based on one of Lovecraft's dreams.
Carter shares many of Lovecraft's personal traits: He is an uncelebrated author, whose writings are seldom noticed. A melancholy figure, Carter is a quiet contemplative dreamer with a sensitive disposition, prone to fainting during times of emotional stress.  But he can also be courageous, with enough strength of mind and character to face and foil the horrific creatures of the Dreamlands.
Lovecraft's character may have been based on a real-life Randolph Carter, who was a Scholar at Christ's College, in the University of Cambridge, from 1892-1895.  Carter took his Part I Tripos2 in Oriental Studies (Arabic), and his Part II in Egyptology.  While at Cambridge, he was an acquaintance of Sir James George Frazer, author of The Golden Bough.  Carter's whereabouts after Cambridge are unclear, but, like his fictional namesake, he may have used the French Foreign Legion as a route into exploring the North African deserts.  College records do not indicate whether Lovecraft was a US or British citizen.

The Dream Cycle:

The Dream Cycle refers to a series of stories by author H. P. Lovecraft.  These stories concern themselves with "The Dreamlands," a vast, alternate dimension that can be entered via dreams.

Geography

The Dreamlands are apparently divided into four regions:
  • The West contains the Steps of Deeper Slumber and Enchanted Wood by which many enter the Dreamlands. Other points of interest include the port of Dylath-Leen, the Dreamlands' largest city; the town of Ulthar "where no man may kill a cat," the coastal jungle city of Hlanith, and the desert trading capital Illarnek.  Here, too, lies the land of Mnar whose gray stones are etched with signs and where rise the ruins of the great Sarnath.
  • The South, home of the isle of Oriab and the areas known as the Fantastic Realms;
  • The East, home of Celephaïs, a city dreamt into being by its monarch Kuranes, greatest of all recorded dreamers, and the dangerous Forbidden Lands;
  • The North, location of the feared Plateau of Leng, home of man-eating spiders and the satyr-like "Men of Leng".
Other locales include the Underworld, a subterranean region underneath the Dreamlands inhabited by various monsters; the Moon, accessible via a ship and inhabited by toad-like "moon-beasts" allied with Nyarlathotep1; and Kadath, a huge castle atop a mountain and the domain of the "Great Ones".
The third novel in the Johannes Cabal series by Jonathan L. Howard, Johannes Cabal: The Fear Institute takes place primarily in The Dreamlands.  Cabal, a scientist and necromancer, is hired by a group, the Fear Institute, to go on an expedition into the Dreamlands to capture the Phobic Animus, the embodiment of fear.  The group travels to Arkham and using the Silver Key enter the Dreamlands where they travel through The Enchanted Forest, Hlanith, Oriab, etc., and encounter Nyarlathotep1.

The Statement of Randolph Carter

"The Statement of Randolph Carter" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft.  Written in December 1919, it was first published in The Vagrant, May 1920.  It tells of a traumatic event in the life of Randolph Carter, a student of the occult loosely representing Lovecraft himself.  It is the first story in which Carter appears and is part of Lovecraft's Dream Cycle.  Lovecraft based the story on a dream that he transcribed, adding only a preamble to make it more fluid as a narrative, and wrote it in the form of a testimony given to the police.  An account of the actual dream Lovecraft had can be found in one of his letters to August Derleth.
"The Statement of Randolph Carter" is the first person, apparently verbatim, testimony of the titular character, who has been found wandering through swampland in an amnesiac shock.  In his statement, Carter attempts to explain the disappearance of his companion, the occultist Harley Warren.
Warren has come into the possession of a book written in an unknown language that he forbids Carter from seeing. Carter mentions that Warren has other "strange, rare books on forbidden subjects", several of which are in Arabic.
From his mysterious book, Warren apparently deduces that doors or stairways exist between the surface world and the underworld through which demons may travel.  He encourages Carter to travel with him to the location of one such portal, an ancient graveyard near Big Cypress Swamp.  Upon arriving, Warren locates a particular tomb and opens it to reveal a staircase that descends into the earth.  Taking a lantern, he leaves Carter on the surface and follows the stairs into the darkness, communicating with his companion by a telephone wire.
After several minutes of silence, Warren suddenly begins to make vague, panicked outbursts that culminate in a desperate plea for Carter to flee.  Finally, after Warren is silent for several minutes, Carter calls to him down the line, only to hear a voice telling him that Warren is dead.



Kammaren (2007)

  • Genre: Drama – Horror
  • Directed: Robert P. Olsson
  • Produced:
    • Ulf Norström 
    • Robert P. Olsson 
    • Roland Olsson 
    • Ulla Olsson
  • Written:
    • H.P. Lovecraft (Inspiration) 
    • Björn-Erik Karlsson (Screenplay) 
    • Robert P. Olsson (Screenplay)
  • Starring: Robert P. Olsson, Johan Eriksson, Glenn Johansson, Kaj Stenberg, Sigvard Strömberg, Rolf Bylund, Margit Eklund, Olof S. Larsson, Joakim Bengtsson
  • Music: Jimi Vix
  • Cinematography: Kristoffer Andrén
  • Editing: Kristoffer Andrén
  • Studio: Big Belly Film
  • Distributed: Big Belly Film
  • Big Belly Film
  • Rated: NR
  • Release Date:
    • 4 May 2007 (Sweden) 
    • 6 October 2007 (US)
  • Running Time: Unknown
  • Country: Sweden
  • Language: Swedish
Tore Forsman is an old man, most people would call strange or even mad.  He lives in an old house on the country side.  All his life he has kept something locked and sealed under his house.  When he suddenly dies a relative, Adam, makes a trip to late Tore’s cabin.  Adam has two friends with him, Björn and Jens.  The spirit of Tore is somewhere to be found and that's a good thing, 'cause something is still waiting.

Kammaren (2007)




13:de mars 1941 (2004)

  • Genre: Drama – Horror
  • Directed: Robert P. Olsson
  • Produced: Robert P. Olsson
  • Written:
    • H.P. Lovecraft (Inspiration) 
    • Björn-Erik Karlsson (Screenplay) 
    • Robert P. Olsson (Screenplay)
  • Starring: Robert Johansson, Robert P. Olsson
  • Music: Johan Strende
  • Cinematography: Kristoffer Andrén
  • Editing:
    • Ulf Norström 
    • Robert P. Olsson
  • Studio: Big Belly Film
  • Distributed: Big Belly Film
  • Rated: NR
  • Release Date:
    • 12 September 2004 (Sweden)
    • 7 October 2005 (US)
  • Running Time: 5 minutes
  • Country: Sweden
  • Language: Swedish


The year is 1941.  Two Investigators are doing research on an old well.  One of the gentlemen climbs down the hole and then they communicate through a military phone.  But something is strange, the place, the hole, and then the phone...



Notes:

1.  Nyarlathotep is a name used for various characters in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and other writers.  The character is commonly known in association with its role as a malign deity in the Cthulhu Mythos fictional universe, where it is known as the Crawling Chaos.  First appearing in Lovecraft's 1920 prose poem of the same name, he was later mentioned in other works by Lovecraft and by other writers and in the tabletop roleplaying games making use of the Cthulhu Mythos.  Later writers describe him as one of the Outer Gods.  Although the deity's name is fictional, it bears the historical Egyptian suffix -hotep, meaning "peace" or "satisfaction."
2.  The University of Cambridge, England, divides the different kinds of honors bachelor's degree by Tripos.  The word has an obscure etymology, but may be traced to the three-legged stool candidates once used to sit on when taking oral examinations (confer tripod).  An apocryphal legend says that students used to receive one leg of a stool in each of their three years of exams, receiving the whole stool at graduation.  Another tradition holds that the name derives from the three brackets printed on the back of the voucher.

Related Articles:

All Images Found Via Google Image Search
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Friends of MMTV

TDIH