DNDF: The Roller Blade Seven Trilogy (1991)(1992)

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Saturday, August 31, 2013

DNDF: The Roller Blade Seven Trilogy (1991)(1992)

Once again it’s time to put on the sexy music, open that bottle of wine and ease on into a night in front of the fire with the one you love.  Tonight we have the sexy adventures of a band of sexy outlaws in the sexy aftermath of a world shattering sexy disaster called…ah crap, it’s a bunch of Scott Shaw movies.

Shaw has had a career in both the arts and the sciences.  He first became noticed as an author when his poetry and literary fiction began to be published in literary journals in the late 1970s.  Beginning in the mid-1980s Shaw's writings also began to be published on the subjects of anthropology and the social sciences.  Though his writings have span many genres, Shaw is most well known as an author on the subject of the martial arts.  This is due to the voluminous amount of written work he has composed on the subject.  Over three hundred of his articles on the martial arts have been published and he is the author of several books on the subject.

The foundation for Shaw's writings on the martial arts began when he was six years old.  This is the point when he began his study of the Korean martial art of Hapkido.

Shaw studied and taught Hapkido and Taekwondo until in 1987 he was the first American to be awarded the 7th Degree Black Belt in Moo Duk Kwan Taekwondo in 1988 he earned the rank of 7th Degree Black Belt in Kumdo.  In 1996 he was the first non-Korean to be promoted to the rank of 7th Degree Black Belt by The Korea Hapkido Federation.  Previous to this he had been certified a Hapkido 7th Degree Black Belt in Hapkido Moo Hak Kwan.  Since that time he has been promoted to 8th Degree Black Belt in both Hapkido and Taekwondo.

Shaw has also written numerous articles and several books on Zen Buddhism, Yoga, Eastern Religion and Asian culture.  These writings are based in the fact that from his youth forward Shaw has been involved with eastern meditative thought.  He was a direct disciple of Swami Satchidananda.  In addition, he studied with such teachers as Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan and Thich Thien-An.  By the age of eighteen he was a certified instructor of Hatha Yoga and Raja Yoga.  At this point in his life he traveled to India where he was initiated into various Buddhist, Hindu and Sufi sects and became Sannyasa.  Shaw is also a Frater Rosae Crucis of the Rosicrucian Order.  He is known to frequently travel in East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia documenting Asian Culture in words and on film.  He lives much of every year at his home in Kamakura, Japan.

In association to his writings, Shaw is also an active actor and filmmaker.  In 1991 he developed a new style of filmmaking that he titled Zen Filmmaking.  This style of filmmaking is defined by the fact that no screenplays are used in the creation of the film.  In an interview in Variety Shaw explains, "In Zen filmmaking the spontaneous creative energy of the filmmaker is the only defining factor.  This allows for a spiritually pure source of immediate inspiration to be the only guide in the filmmaking process."  He also extensively defined this style of filmmaking in a book he authored in 2008 titled, Zen Filmmaking.

Needless to say but he gets more things done before 9am than the entire armed forces.  He makes me feel insecure since I took two days to clean the entire house and he probably cleaned his in less time than it took to type that sentence.  One good thing, MMTV has a new director that I will be writing about since Scott Shaw has many, many more films than just these three.

The Roller Blade Seven (1991)

  • Directed: Donald G. Jackson
  • Produced: Donald G. Jackson, Scott Shaw
  • Written: Donald G. Jackson, Scott Shaw
  • Starring: Scott Shaw, Karen Black, Don Stroud, Frank Stallone, Joe Estevez, William Smith, Rhonda Shear, Jill Kelly
  • Music: Scott Shaw
  • Editing: Scott Shaw
  • Cinematography: Donald G. Jackson
  • Studio: The Rebel Corp.
  • Distributed:
    • Video Omega
    • York Entertainment
  • Rated: NR
  • Release Date: 1991
  • Running Time: 90 minutes
  • Country: United States
  • Language: English

The Roller Blade Seven unfolds in an abstract, dreamlike structure, utilizing minimal dialogue and repetition of footage in key scenes.  Several sequences occur repeatedly, such as a scene in which the protagonist is seen to get on his motorcycle and ride out of a car-park eight times in a row, leaving from a different parking bay each time.

The film follows Hawk Goodman (Scott Shaw) who is sent on a mission by Father Donaldo (Donald G. Jackson) to rescue his sister, Sister Sparrow Goodman, from the clutches of the evil overlord Pharaoh (William Smith) in the apocalyptic world of the future.  The film takes place in a region known as the George Lucas is gonna sue somebody! Wheelzone whose populace travels solely by the means of roller skates or skateboards. Hawk, however, arrives riding a Harley Davidson motorcycle.

Sister Sparrow has been abducted from the Master of Light Institute by the evil Saint Offender (Joe Estevez).  Before Hawk can complete his task, he must take psychedelic mushrooms with cult movie actress Karen Black and learn to rollerblade.  Armed only with his samurai sword, Hawk does battle with the Black Knight (Frank Stallone), rollerblading ninjas and other gangs that inhabit the Wheelzone.  Joining him on this mission are a Kabuki mime with a wiffle bat, a rollerblading banjo player entirely swathed in bandages and a pacifist named Stella Speed.

The Invisible Man and his Tranny Pal! Pharoh's minions have been abducting women to make them his slaves.  He explains that he uses a wheelchair due to an old skateboarding accident, and he longs for the days when he used to be able to ride a skateboard.

There is also an alternate version of the film titled, Hawk: Warrior of the Wheelzone.  In the documentary film Interview: The Documentary the two filmmakers, Donald G. Jackson and Scott Shaw discuss the process they followed in creating this film.  The majority of the dialogue for this film was based upon two books written by Scott Shaw: "Essence" and "Time".

Legend of the Roller Blade Seven (1992)

  • Directed: Donald G. Jackson
  • Produced: Donald G. Jackson, Scott Shaw
  • Written: Donald G. Jackson, Scott Shaw
  • Starring: Scott Shaw, Karen Black, Don Stroud, Frank Stallone, Joe Estevez, William Smith, Rhonda Shear, Jill Kelly
  • Music: Scott Shaw
  • Editing: Scott Shaw
  • Cinematography: Donald G. Jackson
  • Studio: The Rebel Corp.
  • Distributed:
    • Video Omega
    • York Entertainment
  • Rated: NR
  • Release Date: 1992
  • Running Time: 90 minutes
  • Country: United States
  • Language: English

This film is sometimes titled “Legend of the Roller Blade 7” in the media and on the internet, though this was not the actual release title.

This film stars much of the cast from the original feature, including: Scott Shaw, William Smith, Frank Stallone, Karen Black,Don Stroud, Rhonda Shear and Joe Estevez.  Adult film star Jill Kelly can also be seen in this film.

This film takes place in an apocalyptic land of the future known as The Wheelzone.  In this place there are no cars and people travel on skates and skateboards.

The plot of this film traces the exploits of Hawk Goodman (played by Shaw), who is on a quest to rescue several young ladies from the grasp of the evil overlord Pharaoh (played by Smith).

Because this film was composed of footage taken from the other two features associated with this project, The Legend of the Roller Blade Seven follows a very similar storyline to The Roller Blade Seven, with a few elements added from Return of the Roller Blade Seven.  Most notably, a very extensive fight scene where a large number of combatants battle with samurai swords and martial arts.

This film is commonly referred to in the media as the first of two sequels to the cult classic The Roller Blade Seven.  The second sequel, Return of the Roller Blade Seven, was released in 1993.

Though the film is considered the second film in The Roller Blade Seven Trilogy, according to Scott Shaw, this is not the case. In an article he wrote,  The Making of the Roller Blade Seven, that was published in several industry journals, including Independent Film and Video, he states that the executive producer took the other two films associated with this movie: The Roller Blade Seven and Return of the Roller Blade Seven, had them reedited, and combined them into one single film, thereby creating this feature film.  This action was taken without the consent or approval of the two filmmakers.  He states that this film, The Legend of the Roller Blade Seven is, therefore, not endorsed by either Donald G. Jackson nor himself.

The article goes on to state that the actual third film intended for The Roller Blade Seven Trilogy is titled, “Wheelzone Rangers”. This is a film that has not yet been produced.

 

Return of the Roller Blade Seven (1992)

  • Directed: Donald G. Jackson
  • Produced: Donald G. Jackson, Scott Shaw
  • Written: Donald G. Jackson, Scott Shaw
  • Starring: Scott Shaw, Karen Black, Don Stroud, Frank Stallone, Joe Estevez, William Smith, Rhonda Shear, Jill Kelly
  • Music: Scott Shaw
  • Editing: Scott Shaw
  • Cinematography: Donald G. Jackson
  • Studio: The Rebel Corp.
  • Distributed:
    • Video Omega
    • York Entertainment
  • Rated: NR
  • Release Date: 1993
  • Running Time: 90 minutes
  • Country: United States
  • Language: English

The film features much of the cast from the first film; including Scott Shaw, Joe Estevez, Don Stroud, Karen Black, Frank Stallone, and Jill Kelly.

This film picks up where The Roller Blade Seven leaves off. It follows the further adventures of the lead character, Hawk Goodman, played by Shaw.

As was the case of the first two films associated with this project, this film is based on the spiritual redemption of its lead characters.  This movie was filmed in visually striking locations.  It is filled with abstract dialogue and has a non-linear storyline.

The Return of the Roller Blade Seven was created in the distinct style of filmmaking known as Zen Filmmaking. This style of filmmaking was created by Scott Shaw and Donald G. Jackson.  In this style of filmmaking no scripts are used.

After awhile there seems to be a pattern forming in these descriptions.  I may be insane now also.


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